2015

Concubine Mills 45 touches down in Adelaide

BY HARRY FISHER

AUSTRALIA’S newest IRC racing yacht has finished being built and has touched down in Adelaide ahead of a busy training schedule in the lead up to this year’s Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.

The Mills-designed 45-foot Concubine, owned by Jason Ward and his wife Shevaun Bruland and built by Premier Composite Technologies in Dubai, was completed during October and shipped to arrive in Adelaide in mid-November.

Concubine project manager Silas Nolan and co-owner Shevaun Bruland after unwrapping the boat.Photographs: Down Under Sail.

The idea originated in July 2014 during the Sydney to Gold Coast race, which they raced in their Beneteau First 40 of the same name. Being a slow race that year, Bruland admitted that her and Ward “had lots of time to chat during that race”.

Ward, Bruland and their crew went on to race in the 2014 Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race that year in the Beneteau and with the conversation about a newer and faster boat firmly on the table among the crew prior to that race, there was a lot of excitement and a real buzz around the team.

“The genesis of the idea was Sydney-Southport (Gold Coast) … and then it was probably cemented in his (Ward’s) mind when we did Sydney to Hobart and signed up for this boat about a week after we finished,” Bruland said.

“I think Jason’s always thought that the Beneteau that we had was a starting point and always wanted to move on to something bigger and better from there once we found our feet.”

The new Concubine underwent a graphite-coloured paint job, much different to the white Beneteau First 40.

Prior to the Hobart race, Ward and Bruland were approached by professional sailor Silas Nolan, also from Adelaide, who offered to take on the role of project manager for the build process.

Bruland said Nolan’s expertise came in handy and helped the idea of the new boat become a reality quick enough to be able to race to Hobart the following year.

“Probably Silas coming to us and saying that he was available and willing to do a large part of the project management for this was a big part of it,” she said.

Shevaun Bruland cut off the first piece of wrapping.

“Had he not come to us and said that, I don’t think we would have stepped in to it quite this quickly.”

Nolan and Ward traveled to Dubai to meet with the boat builders at the end of October 2014 and began to form an idea of what they wanted to achieve in the build process.

“We met Max and Simon (Premier Composite Technologies) and we had a chat with them and looked around the factory and talked about the concept of what we were trying to achieve and what they wanted to achieve,” Nolan said.

“And then it kind of evolved from there and by the time January came round that’s when we signed the contract and pushed the button and went ‘let’s do it’.”

Although they had set themselves only about 12 months to design and build the boat and have it delivered to Adelaide still with enough time to train and prepare the crew for the Hobart race, Nolan said the process took as long as planned.

Symons and Clark Transport delivered the boat from the ship to Marina Adelaide.

“They didn’t start building the tooling for the boat until March, so the actual turnaround of the build time was relatively quick,” Nolan said.

“But we wanted to give as much time to the designer as possible to be able to design and do some R&D (research and development) in to what the best performing boat for this size was.”

Fast forward to October 2015 and the job was done with the boat ready to be shipped to Adelaide.

During that time, Nolan was traveling through Dubai on his way to and from regattas in Europe and made sure he spent plenty of time at the factory to check up on how the process was going.

Silas Nolan and Shevaun Bruland unwrapping the boat.

He was visiting the factory one to two times a month, not to mention countless emails, phone calls and Skype chats, as well as being there for the final six weeks of the build.

And now the idea has become a reality and the Concubine team is very excited to get their intense training program underway, which includes two weeks of sailing in Adelaide, a fully crewed delivery to Portland as well as training and regattas in Sydney.

Bruland said it was going to be a big step up from the Beneteau, but it was something everyone involved was very excited for.

“I think we’re excited about going a little bit faster. Possibly at times we’ll think we’re going too fast,” she laughed. “But it’s going to be really nice to be able to finish those long races a little bit earlier and enjoy the ride along the way.”

The keel and bowsprit were fitted on Friday, November 13. Photograph: Luke Stephens.

Nolan said a lot of research went in to how the boat would rate on IRC and therefore how it would go against its competitors in the Hobart race.

He said in terms of IRC ratings, Concubine was likely to slot somewhere in between Western Australian Carkeek 47 Indian and Cruising Yacht Club of Australia-based Ker 46 Patrice, however would be very similar on performance.

“There’s going to be gains to certain boats in certain conditions but not in others, but we really won’t know until we go yachting,” Nolan said.

But more importantly, when asked whether they had built a boat that would achieve the best rating for its size, Nolan simply said “absolutely”.

Nolan and Bruland agreed they could talk about ratings as long as they liked, but it was just going to be nice to go a little bit faster.

A weekend full of intense work is underway to get the boat in the water for a week of commissioning and training that will hopefully begin on Monday, November 16.

Owner/skipper Ward had a very busy time at work when the boat was arriving, which included coming home from France in a jetlagged state, so he unfortunately missed the unwrapping on Thursday, November 12.

However Bruland said she was looking forward to getting her husband and the kids around the boat and celebrating the idea finally coming to fruition.

“I think it’ll be really nice to get Jason out here, have him see what he had always wanted as a reality,” she said.

“There’s going to be lots of firsts over the next few weeks, lots and lots, and we’re just really looking forward to enjoying that experience because I don’t know that we’re ever going to build a new boat from scratch again.

“This is probably the first and only time we’ll do this so we’re just planning to enjoy it.”

For more information about Down Under Sail email Harry atdownundersail@gmail.com

MONDAY, 9 NOVEMBER 2015

Tri Series heats up after second round

BY HARRY FISHER

THE competition is heating up in the South Australian Youth Tri Series, which is sponsored by The Sailing Shop, following the end of the second round at Largs Bay Sailing Club last weekend.

More than 80 junior sailors from around the state took to the water for 12 races in what were challenging conditions throughout the weekend.

Brighton’s Jonas Barrett, sailing Sharky leads the way in the optimist fleet. Photograph: Down Under Sail

The Tri Series regatta consists of three separate sailing weekends and aims to prepare sailors for their national regattas at the end of the year.

The Largs Bay event followed on from the first round at the Port Lincoln Yacht Club in early October and precedes the final round, which will be held at the Brighton and Seacliff Yacht Club in early December.

At Largs, the Saturday began with very light winds and racing was postponed early, however as the day went on a light sea breeze filled in from the south-west.

Racing on the Saturday afternoon was the strongest we saw all weekend however on Sunday it was again another light wind affair with challenging conditions throughout the entire day.

420 results

The 420 fleet saw a slight increase in competitors compared to the previous event at Port Lincoln with a few sailors competing in their first Tri Series event for the year.

Brighton’s Alex Higgins and Joal Mckenzie in Binks Marine came away with the overall honours only one point ahead of Matt Meaney and Sam Magarey in Rampage, also from Brighton.

In third place was Adelaide’s Josh Hinks and Alex Newman in The Beast.

Both Higgins and Meaney were competing in their first Tri Series events for the year, which means the race for the overall title at the conclusion of round three in December has been sprung wide open.

Brighton’s Alex Higgins and Joal Mckenzie in Binks Marine were the first placed 420.

International cadet results

The international cadets had close racing throughout the weekend with six out of the 13 competing boats all achieving race wins.

The clear winner however was Largs Bay’s Elise Franson and Rachel Huczko inCheeky Monkeys, who won six races and finished well clear of Largs Bay’s Brooke Gaffney and Darcy Conry in Red Rocket in second and Port Lincoln’s Madeline Harris and Cassie Paynter in Shadow in third.

The team on Shadow as well as fellow Port Lincoln sailors Sam Paynter and Gil Casanova in Full Speed Ahead must be commended for their efforts in making the long 650-kilometre journey from the West Coast to compete.

The Cheeky Monkeys girls are now in the box seat to take out the overall Tri Series title after a second place in Port Lincoln and a first at Largs.

Largs Bay’s Elise Franson and Rachel Huczko in Cheeky Monkeys were the first international cadet.

Optimist results

The optimist racing was fierce all weekend and a fleet of 27 boats put on a show for those lucky enough to witness it.

Brighton’s Alexi Wigglesworth in Optimist was the eventual winner, taking the chocolates from Port Lincoln Tri Series winner, Adelaide’s Ben Hinks in Zig Zag, by two points.

In third place was Brighton’s Jonas Barrett in Sharky who sailed consistently throughout the 12 races to ensure a podium finish.

Brighton and Seacliff were the dominant club on the day with Quinn Auricht, Chelsea Higgins, Finn Sanderson, Harry Higgins and more all having great weekends on the water.

Brighton’s Alexi Wigglesworth in Optimist was first overall.

Green fleet optimist results

In the optimist green fleet, a total of 11 boats made it out with all sailors showing great improvement.

Goolwa’s Oscar Chambers in Wild Porridge was the eventual winner ahead of Brighton’s Amy Short in The Girl Who Waited in second and Adelaide’s Will McAskill inShark Bait in third.

It was great to see the green fleet sailors out on the main course sailing with a lot of confidence and having a lot of fun in amongst all of the more experienced sailors.

Goolwa’s Oscar Chambers in Wild Porridge was the green fleet winner.

O’Pen Bic results

The Largs Bay weekend was also the first weekend we saw the O’Pen Bic class racing with a solid turnout of eight boats on the water.

Goolwa’s Hugo Spees was the overall winner ahead of Adelaide’s Harry Mitton in second and Christies Sailing Club’s Nicholas Ebourne in third.

The Bics are consistently growing as a class that allows children who are new to the sport to get out on the water and enjoy themselves in a fun-first environment.

Hugo Spees was the overall winner in the O’Pen Bic fleet.

Upcoming events

The third and final round of the SA Youth Tri Series will be held at the Brighton and Seacliff Yacht Club on the weekend of December 5 and 6, which is when the overall champions and the best performing club will be recognised.

The competition is heating up and we’re looking forward to seeing how it all pans out.

For full results head to the Yachting South Australia website.

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Harry Fisher via email atdownundersail@gmail.com

SUNDAY, 1 NOVEMBER 2015

Youth tri series racing to heat up in round two

BY HARRY FISHER

SAILORS from around South Australia are hoping to bring some good form in to the second round of the South Australian Youth Tri Series event at the Largs Bay Sailing Club this weekend, a month after the first round finished in Port Lincoln.

The tri series event, sponsored by The Sailing Shop, is a three-part youth regatta in South Australia that prepares young sailors for their national championships at Christmas time.

The international cadet fleet start a race in Port Lincoln. Photo: Down Under Sail

At the conclusion of the three tri series rounds, the overall winners for each class are presented as well as the presentation of the best performing club team.

The first round over the October long weekend at the Port Lincoln Yacht Club set the scene for what is expected to be an exciting weekend of racing at Largs Bay, which will then be followed by the final tri series event at Brighton and Seacliff Yacht Club in December.

The 420, international cadet and optimist open and green fleets took part in the first leg and we should expect to see a stronger contingent of Adelaide-based competitors at the first metropolitan leg of the regatta.

Those who sailed well in Port Lincoln, including Angus Higgins and Joshua Tonkin in the 420, Alyssa and Mitchell Kelsey in the international cadet and Ben Hinks in the optimist, will look to continue their form and continue leading their respective classes heading in to round three.

Ben Hinks and Jonas Barrett go head to head in the optimist fleet. Photo: Down Under Sail

In Port Lincoln the 420 racing was close and Higgins and Tonkin, Brighton and Seacliff, had some close battles with Port Lincoln’s Marty and Hannah Hood as well as Adelaide’s Josh Hinks and Alex Newman.

Brighton and Seacliff’s Alex Higgins is likely to be competing at Largs, which should make for some quality racing at the front of the 420 fleet.

The international cadet fleet was dominated by Port Lincoln and Largs Bay sailors during the first round, so it will be interesting to see how the Largs boats adapt on their home waters.

Hopefully a strong contingent of Port Lincoln sailors travel over for the event, which will make for another strong fleet of cadets.

Ben Hinks, Adelaide, was unstoppable in the optimist fleet in Port Lincoln, finishing first in all 10 races and showing no signs of slowing down.

He was followed by Jonas Barrett and Quinn Auricht, both Brighton and Seacliff, who will be working hard to keep in touch in the overall standings with the talented Hinks to give themselves every chance heading in to round three.

The green fleet will be another opportunity for the less experienced sailors to get a taste of racing in larger fleets with a strong group made up of a lot of metropolitan-based sailors expected for round two.

Lauren Henderson and Rose O’Donnell sailed Gnarly at the first round of the tri series in Port Lincoln. Photo: Down Under Sail

The results from the first round in Port Lincoln are as followed…

420 results
1st: Double Trouble, Angus Higgins and Joshua Tonkin, Brighton and Seacliff, 11 points
2nd: Cutting Edge, Marty Hood and Hannah Hood, Port Lincoln, 15 points
3rd: The Beast, Josh Hinks and Alex Newman, Adelaide, 17 points
4th: Gnarly, Lauren Henderson and Rose O’Donnell, Port Lincoln, 29 points

International cadet results
1st: Tacktical, Alyssa Kelsey and Mitchell Kelsey, Port Lincoln, 14 points
2nd: Cheeky Monkeys, Elise Franson and Rachel Huczko, Largs Bay, 22 points
3rd: Blackout, Indiah Kelsey and Jack O’Donnell, Port Lincoln, 25 points
4th: Splash, Hannah Anspach and Jordan Griffiths, Largs Bay, 27 points
5th: High Calibre, Oliver Hankinson and Braden Griffiths, Largs Bay, 32 points
Only top five positions listed

Optimist results
1st: Zig Zag, Ben Hinks, Adelaide, 8 points
2nd: Sharky, Jonas Barrett, Brighton and Seacliff, 17 points
3rd: Bring It On, Quinn Auricht, Brighton and Seacliff, 25 points
4th: Optimist, Alexi Wigglesworth, Brighton and Seacliff, 28 points
5th: Blitz, Maxwell Brown, Goolwa, 45 points
Only top five positions listed

Green fleet optimist results
1st: Bendigo Bank, Deanna Henderson, Coffin Bay, 21 points
2nd: 1802, Holly Gale, Coffin Bay, 23 points
3rd: TBA, Tayla Kelsey, Port Lincoln, 24 points
4th: Gem, Murphy Cowen, Largs Bay, 31 points
5th: Wild Porridge, Oscar Chambers, Goolwa, 33 points
Only top five positions listed

Down Under Sail will be at Largs Bay this weekend capturing photos and race footage of the event as well as providing our social media followers with live updates throughout the weekend.

Tune in to the Facebook, Twitter and Instagram accounts to stay up to date.

Contact Down Under Sail by emailing editor Harry Fisher atdownundersail@gmail.com

Hundreds of newcomers discover a taste for sailing | PHOTOS, VIDEO

BY HARRY FISHER

THOSE of us that come from sailing families may take it for granted when we think about how we first got interested in the sport.

However there are many people around Australia that are interested in sailing and want to get involved but are having trouble looking for an avenue to gain that accessibility.

New sailors were introduced to the sport at Adelaide Sailing Club’s Discover Sailing Day on Sunday, October 25. Photograph: Tod Weymouth

The National Discover Sailing Day was held on Sunday, October 25, and it gave a lot of people around the country their first taste of the sport and the lifestyle that comes with it.

Prior to the day itself there were more than 300 online registrations in South Australia at the eight participating clubs with the exact numbers predicted to double with “walk-ins” on the day.

The Royal South Australian Yacht Squadron recorded the highest number of registrations prior to the day with 145 people committing online in advance.


Yachting South Australia development manager Ian Leeson said the Discover Sailing Day was a national initiative however it was an opportunity for local clubs in South Australia to showcase the sport and gain new participants.

“The Discover Sailing day is more than a one-off experience, it is the first step on the pathway towards regular participation for many people,” he said.

“The key for clubs to really take advantage of the day is to have other activities scheduled that those who participate in can sign up to in the future, as well as ongoing communication to those who are interested in taking the next step.”

People were introduced to keel boat sailing at the Cruising Yacht Club of South Australia’s Discover Sailing Day. Photograph: CYCSA

Mr Leeson said Yachting South Australia handled all of the local advertising and promotion of the event, which meant clubs were able to deliver the introductory day at zero cost to both the club and the participants.

Yachting Australia outlined three key aims for the Discover Sailing Day in an attempt to bridge the accessibility gap that has held sailing back from being brought to a greater number of new participants over the years.

The key aims are based around introduction and understanding, showcasing and engagement and also delivering the message that clubs across the country are actively seeking new members.

Two of the new sailors that were introduced to the sport at Adelaide Sailing Club. Photo: Tod Weymouth

Mr Leeson said sailing was often a sport that was perceived to be exclusive and only for those who were able to afford their own boats, however that was not the case and the sport was actually very accessible.

“Some people perceive sailing to be a bastion of the rich, but this is far from the truth,” he said.

“So many of our best known and loved sailors came from everyday backgrounds and discovered a passion for the sport through local clubs.”

“Our aim is to deliver a strong message to Australian families that our sailing clubs are welcoming, and have trained people, facilities and boats to help them in their first steps in the sport.”

Discover Sailing Day at the Cruising Yacht Club of South Australia was also a great day for families. Photo: CYCSA

Eight clubs across South Australia, from both metropolitan and regional areas and both keel boat and dinghy clubs, got involved in Discover Sailing Day this year and were able to put more than 300 people on the water for the first time.

Mr Leeson said the day was extremely flexible as well with participants able to go for a sail with an experienced sailor, have a look around club facilities and also find out about upcoming programs that would allow them to participate further in the sport.

For more information about how to get involved in sailing or about future Discover Sailing days visit the Discover Sailing website.

For more information about Down Under Sail email Harry Fisher atdownundersail@gmail.com

SUNDAY, 4 OCTOBER 2015

Mixed bag of conditions for tri series opener

BY HARRY FISHER

THE first round of the South Australian Youth Tri Series kicked off in Port Lincoln at the weekend with a strong contingent of sailors from across the state taking part.

The weather conditions hit both ends of the scale, with a pumping northerly breeze on Saturday morning and barely anything on Sunday, which resulted in a lot of postponements.

To the credit of race officer Andy Dyer and his team, a total of 10 races were sailed over the two days while the green fleet managed to get 11 races in.

Three classes were represented with 420s, international cadets and optimists all getting involved, with the optimists also having a green fleet that raced closer to shore.

Airlie O’Brien sailed Hamilton Island Mentor. Photographs: Down Under Sail

420 results

In the 420s, Angus Higgins and Joshua Tonkin in Double Trouble (BSYC) came away as the winners of the weekend, after sailing consistently in all weather conditions.

They put themselves in a good position ahead of the remainder of the Tri Series regattas later in the year and will hope to continue their form in to Largs Bay and then Brighton and Seacliff in the coming months.

They narrowly edged out Marty and Hannah Hood in Cutting Edge (PLYC) who had some up and down results while Josh Hinks and Alex Newman in The Beast (ASC) finished closely behind them in third.

There were only four 420s racing in this event after the late withdrawal of Alex Higgins and Joal Mackenzie in Binks Marine, however this combination is likely to shake things up at the remaining two regattas.

1st: Double Trouble, Angus Higgins and Joshua Tonkin, Brighton and Seacliff, 11 points
2nd: Cutting Edge, Marty Hood and Hannah Hood, Port Lincoln, 15 points
3rd: The Beast, Josh Hinks and Alex Newman, Adelaide, 17 points
4th: Gnarly, Lauren Henderson and Rose O’Donnell, Port Lincoln, 29 points

Angus Higgins and Joshua Tonkin sailed Double Trouble to victory in the 420s.

International cadet results

The cadet class displayed some of the closest racing on offer for the weekend with sailors right across the board getting results at either end of the fleet.

A few extra race wins proved the difference for the eventual winner, which was Alyssa and Mitchell Kelsey in Tacktical (PLYC).

The newly formed Kelsey combination sailed well in all conditions but a flurry of race wins on day one gave them a lead that all but secured the win.

Closely following was Elise Franson and Rachel Huczko in Cheeky Monkeys (LBSC), who had a mixed bag of results but managed to sail well enough to secure second place, while Indiah Kelsey and Jack O’Donnell in Blackout (PLYC) managed to hold down third place.

The weekend was also the first leg of the state championships for the cadets, whichTacktical now holds a comfortable lead in.

1st: Tacktical, Alyssa Kelsey and Mitchell Kelsey, Port Lincoln, 14 points
2nd: Cheeky Monkeys, Elise Franson and Rachel Huczko, Largs Bay, 22 points
3rd: Blackout, Indiah Kelsey and Jack O’Donnell, Port Lincoln, 25 points
4th: Splash, Hannah Anspach and Jordan Griffiths, Largs Bay, 27 points
5th: High Calibre, Oliver Hankinson and Braden Griffiths, Largs Bay, 32 points
Only top five positions listed

Alyssa Kelsey and Mitchell Kelsey sailed Tacktical to victory in the cadet fleet.

Optimist results

The optimist racing proved to be a dominant affair, with the overall winner finishing in first place in all 10 races.

Ben Hinks, sailing Zig Zag (ASC), sailed exceptionally well and left the fleet in his wake, cruising through to what were 10 outstanding race victories.

The battle for the remaining positions was a lot fiercer, with Jonas Barrett in Sharky (BSYC) able to claim second place, while Quinn Auricht in Bring It On (BSYC) finished in third.

There were some great performances right throughout the optimist fleet including Maxwell Brown in Blitz (GAC), who finished fifth and was the first placed Goolwa boat, and Airlie O’Brien sailing Hamilton Island Mentor (PLYC), who finished 15th and was the first Port Lincoln boat.

The next two legs of the Tri Series are expected to have some slightly larger fleets as some sailors were unable to make the trip to Port Lincoln for round one.

1st: Zig Zag, Ben Hinks, Adelaide, 8 points
2nd: Sharky, Jonas Barrett, Brighton and Seacliff, 17 points
3rd: Bring It On, Quinn Auricht, Brighton and Seacliff, 25 points
4th: Optimist, Alexi Wigglesworth, Brighton and Seacliff, 28 points
5th: Blitz, Maxwell Brown, Goolwa, 45 points
Only top five positions listed

Ben Hinks sailed Zig Zag to victory in the optimist open fleet.

Green fleet optimist results

A great turnout of local boats from Port Lincoln and Coffin Bay made up the majority of the optimist green fleet, which had some great sailing and provided a great weekend of development for the up and coming youngsters.

Deanna Henderson sailing Bendigo Bank (CBYC) won the green fleet honours with consistent performances across the 11 races.

She finished just ahead of Holly Gale sailing 1802 (CBYC) who was second overall and Tayla Kelsey sailing TBA (PLYC) in third.

On the Saturday morning the green fleet did not sail due to windy conditions however throughout the remainder of their racing, race officer Paul Harris did a great job getting them through as many races as possible on the smaller course.

The coaches said all the young sailors improved out of sight throughout the weekend and sailed really well considering the challenging conditions.

1st: Bendigo Bank, Deanna Henderson, Coffin Bay, 21 points
2nd: 1802, Holly Gale, Coffin Bay, 23 points
3rd: TBA, Tayla Kelsey, Port Lincoln, 24 points
4th: Gem, Murphy Cowen, Largs Bay, 31 points
5th: Wild Porridge, Oscar Chambers, Goolwa, 33 points
Only top five positions listed

Deanna Henderson sailed Bendigo Bank to victory in the optimist green fleet.

Up and coming events

The second leg of the SA Youth Tri Series will be held at the Largs Bay Sailing Club on November 7 and 8 and the third and final leg will be held at the Brighton and Seacliff Yacht Club on December 5 and 6.

Each weekend will count as its own regatta while trophies will also be presented to the best performing boats and the best performing club across all three events.

For full results click here and for more information about Down Under Sail contactHarry Fisher via email at downundersail@gmail.com

THURSDAY, 1 OCTOBER 2015

SA Youth Tri Series set to excite

BY HARRY FISHER

SOME of South Australia’s best young sailing talent will descend on Port Lincoln this weekend for the first leg of the South Australian Youth Tri Series regatta.

As the name suggests, the event is a three-part regatta designed to give young sailors an opportunity to race against the best talent from around the state in preparation for their national regattas at the end of the year.

The optimist fleet gets underway at the SA Youth States earlier this year. Photograph: Down Under Sail

Sailing will kick off in Port Lincoln this Saturday and Sunday, the second leg will be held at Largs Bay Sailing Club on November 7 and 8 and the regatta concludes at Brighton and Seacliff Yacht Club on December 5 and 6.

Down Under Sail is proud to announce a new partnership with Yachting South Australia, which will see us covering five of South Australia’s key youth events throughout the year including the three legs of the Tri Series, the SA Youth States/Adelaide Premier Regatta and the SA Schools Team Sailing States.

We would like to thank YSA for the opportunity to be a part of what’s shaping up to be an exciting season for youth sailing in South Australia and hope you enjoy our coverage.

For live updates throughout each event be sure to follow Down Under Sail onFacebook, Twitter and Instagram and keep your eye on the website for results and news stories.

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Marc Ablett or Harry Fisher atdownundersail@gmail.com

MONDAY, 23 MARCH 2015

Perth sharpie fleet boosted by juniors

MANY yacht clubs find it hard to keep keen young sailors involved and in particular, get them to transition from junior classes into senior dinghies without drifting away from the sport.

It’s not always easy and it’s not as simple as just having a ‘step-up’ class sitting there for them to get into.

Some of Perth’s junior sailors who gave sharpie sailing a go at. Photograph: WA Sharpies.

Mounts Bay Sailing Club on Perth’s Swan River is one club that’s recognised this issue and has turned its eyes back towards old-fashioned ‘try-out’ days to broaden junior perspectives on sailing.

On Sunday, the Western Australian division of the Australian Sharpie Sailing Association had six sharpies on the water, each skippered by juniors, including several not even in their teens.

“It was a fantastic experience, not just for the kids, but surprisingly for the older guys crewing for them,” WA sharpie secretary Neil Stanbury said.

“I think we had as much fun as the kids steering.”

Mr Stanbury said the event marketed well to the younger generation and the sharpie association did not have any issues convincing juniors to get involved.

“This year we identified some kids we wanted to get involved and tapped them on the shoulder about taking part.

“They didn’t need much convincing to give the long boats a go.

“The model really seemed to work. They can already sail, so it was a case of running through the unique things about sharpies on the lawn first; like how they generally behave on the water, handling gybes, that they take a bit longer to spin around than a flying ant, and so on.”

The format was three short races on a windward/leeward course, which made for close, competitive racing and plenty of excitement.

The tremendous thing was that not one of those skippers did badly, even though there were a couple of swims.

Mr Stanbury said having each boat with two seasoned sharpie sailors in the crewing positions increased the junior sailors confidence and made it a more enjoyable learning experience.

“It was a fairly light day at around 10 to 15 knots which was ideal, but it kicked in a little later on and there was a great moment when boats just took off with the kite up and a young bloke on the tiller was giggling and grinning from ear to ear,” Mr Stanbury said.

“It was definitely that moment when I think he mentally thought ‘yep, I could see myself in one of these later on’.”

Sharpie sailors Ian Davidson and Craig Mann show the juniors the ropes. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

The WA sharpie association, which ran a very successful national championship at Mounts Bay two years ago, has already decided to run two try-out days next season; one early in summer and another later in the season, as well as cranking the promotion of these days up as a ‘Dash for Cash’ format and inviting young sailors from other classes and other clubs.

“Kids aren’t that complicated. They basically want to have fun, give something new a go and if there’s some prizes going, that’s a bonus, so the promise of a few cash prizes should be a hit,” Mr Stanbury said.

“This time, we gave out some sharpie t-shirts that’ll no doubt get worn around the place, plus some sharpie stickers.”

The try-out day comes just a week before Mounts Bay’s closing day, then in the next month the club will hold a strategic meeting to talk about the best ways to strengthen junior sailing in the future.

“It’s a fairly complex and multi-pronged issue.

“You’ve got to have the right classes, the right environment where kids want to be, have parents happy about the program and generally make it fun.”

Mr Stanbury said Olympic pathway classes were not for every sailor and it was good the juniors knew the sharpie was there for them in the future.

“Not every kid’s going to be an Olympic sailor so frankly ISAF classes aren’t the priority for clubs like ours, even though if you want to sail a 49er or 29er there’s a place for you here,” he said.

“Just like a boat, you have to get your settings just right and if you look around, the clubs that have thriving junior scenes are doing that.”

Sharpies have a big future in Australia, being challenging, exciting, social and an addiction to both social sailors and also those who want to be very competitive.

They are relatively low-cost and have the bonus of great state and national-level fleet sailing.

The class had its genesis at Mounts Bay in the 1960s after the Addison brothers introduced the class, it took off nationally and has never looked back.

“We’re really optimistic about sharpies and their future here in WA, but we’ve got to invest in the juniors and get them to realise that these are boats that give so much back to you, as adults.”

“There are guys here who’ve been sailing them for 30 or 40 years, Paul Main’s still skippering a sharpie and he’s in his 50th year and none of them want to give it away.

“That’s gotta mean something, so it’s a message we want to share.”

For more information about sailing sharpies in Australia, visit the national website.

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Marc or Harry atdownundersail@gmail.com

SATURDAY, 7 MARCH 2015

Depth of talent in South Australian junior ranks

BY HARRY FISHER

WINNERS have been decided for the 2015 Musto South Australian Youth State Championships held over the weekend at the Adelaide Sailing Club.

There was a lot of talent on display with junior sailors across the state sailing well in the difficult conditions.

Harry Mitton in Big Bic won the open bic state championship. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

In the youth championships, optimists (open and green fleets), open bics, international cadets, 420s and lasers were the competing classes while there was also a 49er and finns on the course for the weekend.

The 420s, lasers and finns held their state championships as part of the weekend’s sailing and crowned their new champions in the seven race series.

The optimists raced eight races and the overall winner was Alex Magarey sailingDodger who finished six points clear of Ben Hinks in Zig Zag in second and Finn Sanderson in Infinnity in third.

At the presentation, Alex paid tribute to his fellow competitors for pushing him on the race course and providing tough competition.

Jane Lane and Sarah Paterson sailed Violet Crumble in the 420 states. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

In the optimist green fleet Sam Aplin in Carnage won ahead of James Wilson in Jaws in second and Issy Chisholm in Spoto in third.

In the open bic class, Harry Mitton sailing Big Bic won the regatta and also was crowned as the state champion after sailing a consistent regatta.

He finished 5.5 points clear of Peeter Kaju in TBA in second and Harrison Barrett inHazardous in third.

In the international cadets, Emily Patching and Holly Schnaars in Uncut were the clear winners ahead of Marty Hood and Jack O’Donnell in Bob in second and Brooke Gaffney and Darcy Conry in Red Rocket in third.

Andy Dyer finished fourth in the laser state championship. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

In the 420s Nicci Edwards and Patrick Royle in Anything Goes won the regatta and the state championship ahead of Alex Higgins and Joal Mackenz in Selden in second and Matt Meaney and Sam Magarey in Rampage in third.

Jane Lane and Laura Groome in Violet Crumble were third overall in the state championship however did not qualify under age restrictions in the youth championships.

In the youth section of the laser radials, Ben Knoop won ahead of Ash Dyer in second and John Gordon in third.

Luke Stephens was third overall in the radial state championship however did not qualify as a youth.

In the laser 4.7 class, Jackson Knoop won the regatta and the state championship ahead of Oscar Mitton in second and Ethan Clerke in third.

Ash Dyer and Jade Forbes were crowned as the women’s champions of the regatta in the radial and 4.7 classes respectively.

For the laser full rig state championship Andrew Darcy won ahead of Scott Marshall in second and Sean Homan in third.

In the finn state championship Neville Wild sailing Moby was crowned as the state champion nudging out last year’s winner Dirk Seret in Dark Secret in second and Danny Parkinson in Mulga Bill in third.

Yachting South Australia did a great job of running the youth championships and the club house at the Adelaide Sailing Club was full for the presentation with sailors, parents and friends in support of youth sailing in South Australia.

For full results head to the Adelaide Sailing Club website.

For more information about Down Under Sail email Marc or Harry atdownundersail@gmail.com

FRIDAY, 6 MARCH 2015

Tricky winds for start of SA youth states

BY HARRY FISHER

LIGHT and difficult conditions on day one of the Musto South Australian Youth State Championships provided a challenging start to the regatta for many sailors.

Several junior classes were represented for the youth states while some senior classes also got on the water for their state championships.

Close Encounters racing in the 2015 Musto SA Youth States. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

The lasers, 420s and finns all raced the first races of their state championship today while optimists (racing and green fleets), open bics and international cadets all participated as part of the youth states.

A lone 49er went out for a sail and had some great rides, considering the conditions were not as windy as they would have liked.

Racing began at midday on Saturday and a handful of races were sailed in what were moderate conditions with a tricky chop.

Luke Stephens sailing in his laser radial. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

For a little while it looked like a strong south-westerly sea breeze was going to come in however it didn’t eventuate and most of the racing took place in around 10-knot breezes.

Nicci Edwards and Patrick Royle were dominant in the 420 class, while Emily Patching and Holly Schnaars have steamed ahead in the international cadet results.

It looks like it’s close racing in all other classes so stay tuned to the Adelaide Sailing Club website for the official race results.

For more photos of the racing head to the Down Under Sail Facebook page.

Port Lincoln youngsters set for youth states

BY HARRY FISHER

NINE Port Lincoln youngsters will travel to Adelaide this weekend to compete in the 2015 South Australian Youth Championships at the Adelaide Sailing Club.

Among the group are some of Port Lincoln’s most talented young sailors including Marty Hood, who recently finished seventh in the international cadet nationals with crew Jack O’Donnell in home waters.

Port Lincoln sailors traveling to Adelaide for the state youth championships are Jack O’Donnell, Gil Casanova, Sam Paynter, Zali Forbes, Cameron Forbes, Jade Forbes and Marty Hood. Absent: Maddy Harris and Cassie Paynter. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

Hood and O’Donnell, sailing Bob, qualified for the world championships in Lake Garda, Italy later this year along with Adelaide-based boat Uncut sailed by Emily Patching and Holly Schnaars.

Sam Paynter and Gil Casanova in Full Speed Ahead and Maddy Harris and Cassie Paynter in Shadow will also head to Adelaide to be a part of the three-strong Port Lincoln cadet fleet at the youth championships.

Port Lincoln will also be represented in the laser fleet with Cameron Forbes in the radial and Jade and Zali Forbes sailing 4.7s.

All of Port Lincoln’s sailors have prepared well for the event through their regular club sailing and state tri-series events and are looking forward to heading over to Adelaide to compete against the metropolitan-based competitors.

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also have a look at the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

Yachting South Australia development manager Ian Leeson said regional sailors played a big part in the development of the sport throughout South Australia and they deserved recognition for their effort in traveling to Adelaide.

“It’s great to see such strong numbers of junior sailors competing at state events such as the Musto state youth championships and tri-series,” he said.

“Especially those youngsters from regional areas such as Port Lincoln who not only make the same commitment to their sailing as their metro counterparts but also have to travel a substantial distance to compete at state level.”

Port Lincoln sailors are also heavily involved in the state schools team sailing system and continue to achieve great results in that aspect of the sport.

Leeson said regional areas like Port Lincoln provided further depth of talent for junior sailing in South Australia as well as its representative teams.

“Port Lincoln is certainly is a ‘hot bed’ of talent given it’s relative size and many of our current state squads are made up of Port Lincoln sailors,” he said.

“The support and community atmosphere offered by regional clubs certainly helps to develop young sailors to achieve their full potential.”

Events like the state youth championship also give regional sailors the opportunity to forge friendships with those in the city, which form the foundation of enjoyment in sailing.

“As every sailor knows it’s not just the on-water aspect that keeps the kids coming back, it’s the social side and feeling of inclusion in something bigger,” Leeson said.

“Junior sailing is currently in a growth period within the state and with the support of clubs across the state it will continue to grow.

“Going forward the future of our sport looks very bright in South Australia.”
The state youth championship will be held on Saturday and Sunday with a youth transition day on Monday to encourage young sailors to progress in to more advanced classes.

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Marc Ablett or Harry Fisher by emailing downundersail@gmail.com

WEDNESDAY, 25 FEBRUARY 2015

Secret Mens Business wins Lincoln Week

BY HARRY FISHER

TP-52 Secret Mens Business, skippered by Geoff Boettcher, has taken out the 2015 Club Marine/Lexus Lincoln Week regatta in dominant fashion.

Finishing the fifth and final race of the regatta with a third on IRC, Secret Mens clinched the overall result ahead of a fast finishing Concubine, skippered by Jason Ward.

Rob Date’s Scarlet Runner trailed behind Geoff Boettcher’s Secret Mens Business. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

Concubine finished off their Lincoln Week campaign on a high on Thursday with an IRC win in the fifth and final race of the regatta, which secured second place ahead of Andrew Corletto’s Shining Sea in third.

After a three-hour on shore postponement on the final day due to light winds, the fleet eventually got on the water for one out of the two scheduled races in a northeasterly breeze around five knots.

Unfortunately, principal race officer Mike Rogers was not able to start a second race after 1.30pm and sent the racing division back to the marina after the conclusion of the first windward/leeward race.

The cruising division had a day race that was scheduled to finish in front of the Port Lincoln Yacht Club in Boston Bay however due to the light winds and the risk of a dying breeze, they shortened the course to an earlier mark.

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also have a look at the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

It was close racing off the start line in the final race for division one with Secret Mens Business and Rob Date’s Scarlet Runner closer than they had been all week.

After the first of three laps, Secret Mens was able to edge further ahead and eventually finished well ahead of Scarlet Runner beating them on IRC with a race result of third.

Behind Concubine on division one IRC in the final race was Aikin in second who, after a difficult first day, ended up with some great results and showed what they were capable of.

The inclusion of Wild Rose skipper and three time Sydney to Hobart handicap winner Roger Hickman proved to be an advantage on the tactical front, withAikin matching it closely on the course with boats much bigger and finishing with quality IRC results.

Jason Ward’s Concubine in race mode. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

Unfortunately they finished fifth on overall IRC due to having to carry a non-result from the first day where crew member Dave Royle suffered a head injury during a bottom mark rounding.

The division one IRC results finished with Secret Mens in first, Concubine in second and Shining Sea in third.

On AMS it was a similar story with Secret Mens winning overall however the rest of the podium was flipped with Shining Sea in second and Concubine in third.

In division one PHS, the fleet was spread wide open with some extremely competitive results and only two points separating the top four boats and two boats finishing equal for third.

Kym Clarke’s Fresh racing on the final day. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

Concubine won the division ahead of David Knights’ Sydney 38 White Knight in second and Kym Clarke’s Fresh in third.

Fresh was unlucky not to come away with the win after a disappointing final race dropped them from first place to third overall.

In division two, Jonathan Newbury’s Sextant proved to be the dominant boat with convincing overall wins on both IRC and AMS as well as a second place on PHS handicap.

Sextant made mince meat of the division two fleet and has been no stranger at the daily presentations throughout the week consistently receiving prizes for race wins under all rating systems.

Jonathan Newbury’s Sextant was the dominant division two boat. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

Behind them on IRC was the only other competitor in the division registered for IRC inBacardi, skippered by Martin Power.

On overall division two AMS, Sextant was followed by Doug Gladman’s Peer Gynt in second and Pete and Marissa Chalkley’s Hush in third.

In division two PHS, Peter Montgomery’s Blue Max finished first ahead of Sextant in second and Paul McGeever’s Splitter in third.

The five-strong fleet of Sydney 38s sailed in their own division as well as in division one for the regatta and finished with some close results.

David Knights’ White Knight won the Sydney 38 division. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

Heading in to the final day, Seb Bohm’s Slipknot was equal on points with White Knight however a disappointing final day from the Slipknot team put them behind on the final overall result.

White Knight sailed a fast final race to take the convincing win over Slipknot in second to win by a point.

In third place sailing a consistent regatta was Derek Morrison’s The Asylum who had some good results but wasn’t quite within striking distance of the top two boats come the end of the regatta.

The cruising boats sailed four long races over the four days to constitute their regatta and after the week was said and done it was David Smallacombe’s Steeple Jack winning the overall result on a countback ahead of Paul Richards’ Tanqueray in second.

Tanqueray led overall going in to the final day however after finishing with a fourth in the final race, ended up second overall behind Steeple Jack.

Brian Hill’s Jupiter was also not far off the pace finishing in third overall a point behind first and second.

Rob Date’s Scarlet Runner sailing on Boston Bay. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

For full results head to the Lincoln Week website at www.lincolnweek.com.au

For more information about Down Under Sail email Marc or Harry atdownundersail@gmail.com

MONDAY, 23 FEBRUARY 2015

Secret Mens dominant in Taylors Island race

BY HARRY FISHER

SECRET Mens Business took out another resounding win on both IRC and AMS in the Taylors Island long race on Tuesday during day two of the Club Marine/Lexus Lincoln Week regatta.

The long race was sailed in a consistent southeasterly sea breeze starting with a short beat to the southern Boston Bay entrance beacon before heading around the Donington point and south towards Taylors Island.

Cailin Howard and David Oliver’s Aikin chasing down Kym Clarke’s Fresh. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

The fleet then sailed downwind back to Donington and in to Boston Bay before finishing in front of the Port Lincoln Yacht Club, ideally positioned for the spectators at the Diamond Day ladies function.

Secret Mens Business continued their good form from day one and were out of the blocks early with a dominant pin end start.

They broke away from rival Scarlet Runner and built on the lead throughout the race to be first over the finish line by a considerable margin.

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also have a look at the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

Jason Ward’s Concubine also started well, as did Cailin Howard and David Oliver’sAikin who were the next boats to round the entrance beacon.

From that point on the race became wide open and a few boats sailed stellar races to secure great PHS results.

The Brothers, skippered by Peter Young were making great gains all race and matching it with boats rated much higher than them.

Geoff Boettcher’s Secret Mens Business sailing in Boston Bay in the Taylors Island long race. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

Young claimed the PHS victory ahead of Derek Morrison’s The Asylum in second and Scott Mutton’s 3 Cool Cats in third.

The controversy of the day surrounded Scarlet Runner, skippered by Rob Date, who missed a rounding mark inside Boston Bay and therefore did not receive a result.

Scarlet Runner was not far behind Secret Mens Business when they entered the bay and was looking likely to record a good result.

Scott Mutton’s 3 Cool Cats sailed well to finish third on PHS handicap. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

On IRC, Secret Mens Business was followed by Andrew Corletto’s Shining Sea in second and Jason Ward’s Concubine in third, who are both showing great form in the regatta.

Secret Mens Business also took out the AMS race win ahead of Cailin Howard and David Oliver’s Aikin in second and Shining Sea in third.

Aikin welcomed current Sydney to Hobart handicap winner and yachting legend Roger Hickman to the boat in the absence of David Royle, who proved to add some extra experience to the already talented team. Check out the full story on Hicko in Port Lincoln here.

Hayden McFarlane’s Misty heading out of Boston Bay in the cruising division. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

In the cruising division Steeple Jack, skippered by David Smallacombe, came away with the race win in their second race of the regatta, followed by Paul Richards’ Tanqueray in second and Brian Hill’s Jupiter in third.

Wednesday’s racing will be the famous Spalding Cove race where boats will arrive for the Megga’s BBQ event that takes place on the beach and is one of the most enjoyable parts of the Lincoln Week regatta.

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Marc Ablett or Harry Fisher by emailing downundersail@gmail.com

Yachting legend subs in for Lincoln Week

THREE-time Sydney to Hobart handicap winner and Australian yachting legend Roger Hickman, sailed on board Cailin Howard and David Oliver’s Aikin on Tuesday for day two of the Club Marine/Lexus Lincoln Week regatta.

Hickman, better known to the sailing world as Hicko, visited Port Lincoln as the guest speaker for the skippers cocktail function on Monday night and was asked to join Aikin after crew David Royle went down with an injury on the water on Monday.

Aikin skipper Cailin Howard with three-time Sydney to Hobart handicap winner Roger Hickman on board Aikin. Photograph: Harry Fisher, Down Under Sail.

Hickman said he enjoyed sailing on the waters of Boston Bay for the first time since 2001, and described the sailing and the coastline as Australia’s equivalent of Bermuda.

“Sailing around the islands and along the coast here is like sailing in Bermuda,” he said.

“It was a beautiful breeze and the weather got better and better.”

Hickman last visited Port Lincoln in 2001 after racing in the Adelaide to Port Lincoln Yacht Race on Ausmaid, which he won the Sydney to Hobart in the year before.

His visit to Port Lincoln this year followed on from a busy summer of sailing, which had another Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race handicap win and an appearance in the Etchell national championships in Adelaide.

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also have a look at the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

Hickman said joining Aikin in the absence of Royle was a “wonderful opportunity to go sailing” and it was nice to be able to join a team where you were needed rather than being a burden.

He said he was now hoping to change his flights to enjoy the final two days of sailing at the regatta and spend more time getting to know the sailors and enjoying the quality sailing conditions.

“Why would you leave God’s country to go back to the big smoke,” Hickman said.

“It’s absolute champagne sailing here in Port Lincoln.”

Hickman said the potential existed to take his champion boat Wild Rose to Port Lincoln for the Adelaide to Port Lincoln and Lincoln Week regatta, but we would have to wait and see.

To contact Down Under Sail email Marc or Harry at downundersail@gmail.com

SUNDAY, 22 FEBRUARY 2015

Strong winds cause carnage on day one

STRONG winds reaching more than 20 knots greeted sailors on Boston Bay on Monday for day one of the Club Marine/Lexus Lincoln Week regatta.

The day was full of surprises with injured crews, men overboard and several spinnakers ending up underneath boats.

Scarlet Runner heads upwind while Secret Men’s Business leads them on the downwind leg. Photograph: Harry Fisher, Down Under Sail.

David Royle on Aikin suffered a head injury during a bottom mark rounding in race one that forced the boat to head to shore with no finished results.

Royle was knocked down by the boom and was immediately taken to an awaiting ambulance on shore and fortunately is safe and in good health.

David Royle from Aikin being treated by paramedics after a head wound on day one of the Lincoln Week regatta. Photograph: Aikin ker 11.3 Facebook page.
Geoff Boettcher’s Secret Men’s Business was the dominant boat of the day claiming two IRC victories and putting themselves in a strong early position to win the regatta.

They started well in both races and were always quick to assert their dominance on arch-rival Scarlet Runner, skippered by Rob Date, who was only slightly off the pace.

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also have a look at the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

Concubine, skippered by Jason Ward, sailed consistently finishing with a third and a second in IRC as well as commendable results on PHS.

In race two there were even more issues with Kym Clarke’s Port Lincoln-based Sydney 47 Fresh losing a spinnaker at a bottom mark rounding.

The fleet off the start line in race one of the Lincoln Week regatta. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

Both clews on the sail blew out after the sail fell under the boat, which caused the sail to fly like a kite in the air more than 50 metres downwind of the boat.

It cost Fresh considerably in the overall results for race two as rival Endorfin crossed the line ahead to win on IRC.

In the cruising division boats sailed a day race across Boston Bay finishing in front of the Port Lincoln Yacht Club with Paul Richards’ Tanqueray taking the PHS win ahead of Brian Hill’s Jupiter in second and John Sibly’s Coco in third.

Shining Sea heads to the windward mark in race one. Photograph: Down Under Sail.
The results were as followed:
Racing division

Race one:
IRC division one: 1st Secret Men’s Business, 2nd Shining Sea, 3rd Concubine;

IRC division two: 1st Sextant, 2nd Bacardi;
AMS division one: 1st Shining Sea, 2nd Concubine, 3rd Secret Men’s Business;
AMS division two: 1st Sextant, 2nd Peer Gynt, 3rd Hush;
PHS division one: 1st Concubine, 2nd Shining Sea, 3rd Fresh;
PHS division two: 1st Sextant, 2nd Bacardi, 3rd Hush;

Race two:
IRC division one: 1st Secret Men’s Business, 2nd Concubine, 3rd Reverie;
IRC division two: 1st Bacardi, 2nd Sextant;
AMS division one: 1st Secret Men’s Business, 2nd Concubine, 3rd Reverie;
AMS division two: 1st Sextant, 2nd Peer Gynt, 3rd Hush;
PHS division one: 1st Slipknot, 2nd Vulcan, 3rd Concubine;
PHS division two: 1st Blue Max, 2nd Bacardi, 3rd Hush;

Cruising division

Race one:
PHS: 1st Tanqueray, 2nd Jupiter, 3rd Coco;

For full results head to the Lincoln Week website at www.lincolnweek.com.au

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Marc Ablett or Harry Fisher by emailing downundersail@gmail.com

Lincoln Week regatta: race one

BY HARRY FISHER

WINDS reaching more than 20 knots greeted sailors on Boston Bay on Monday morning for day one of the Club Marine/Lexus Lincoln Week regatta.

Plenty of boats had issues with the strong winds including a head injury to David Royle on Aikin during a bottom mark rounding.

Part of the fleet sailing downwind during race one of the Lincoln Week regatta. Photograph: Down Under Sail.
Royle was knocked down by the boom and was immediately taken to an awaiting ambulance on shore.
We received word from Royle that he was conscious and the injuries were thankfully not as serious as they could have been.
Secret Men’s Business powered ahead in race one and crossed the line ahead of Scarlet Runner by a considerable margin.
The results are as followed:
IRC division one: 1st Secret Men’s Business, 2nd Shining Sea, 3rd Concubine;
IRC division two: 1st Sextant, 2nd Bacardi;
AMS division one: 1st Shining Sea, 2nd Concubine, 3rd Secret Men’s Business;
AMS division two: 1st Sextant, 2nd Peer Gynt, 3rd Hush;
PHS division one: 1st Concubine, 2nd Shining Sea, 3rd Fresh;
PHS division two: 1st Sextant, 2nd Bacardi, 3rd Hush;

SATURDAY, 21 FEBRUARY 2015

Shining Sea claim IRC and AMS titles

BY HARRY FISHER

BENETEAU First 45 Shining Sea has taken out the IRC and AMS titles for the 2015 Club Marine/Lexus Adelaide to Port Lincoln Yacht Race.

Skipper Andrew Corletto and his crew sailed a consistent race and managed to keep the boat moving through difficult stages of the race near Dangerous Reef.

Andrew Corletto’s Shining Sea won the Adelaide to Port Lincoln race on IRC and AMS. Photograph: Fran Solly, Take 2 Photography.

They finished the race just more than 47 minutes ahead of Alan Woodward’s Reverie, another Beneteau First 45, on corrected time and just less than 52 minutes ahead of Kym Clarke’s Sydney 47 Fresh.

Geoff Boettcher’s Secret Men’s Business was the line honours winner finishing the race in 18 hours, 9 minutes and 5 seconds, 40 minutes ahead of Rob Date’s Scarlet Runner in second.

Geoff Boettcher’s TP-52 Secret Men’s Business claimed line honours after finishing the race in light breezes in Boston Bay. Photograph: Fran Solly, Take 2 Photography.

The two boats battled it out throughout the night with Scarlet Runner closing up what was a considerable lead to almost snatch line honours in the dying seconds.

Cailin Howard and David Oliver’s Aikin was a close fourth on IRC and also came second on AMS, in what was a satisfying race for those on board.

Kym Clarke’s Port Lincoln based Sydney 47 Fresh was third overall on IRC. Photograph: Fran Solly, Take 2 Photography.

In the end however, the race proved to rate well for the Beneteaus with first and second place on IRC for the First 45s and Jason Ward’s First 40 Concubine in fifth, and Andrew Saies Two True in sixth.

The Port Lincoln Yacht Club will host the race presentation party today, which is always touted as one of the best ways to celebrate the successful completion of another Adelaide to Port Lincoln Yacht Race.

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also have a look at the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Marc Ablett or Harry Fisher by emailing downundersail@gmail.com

Adelaide to Port Lincoln: live blog

BY HARRY FISHER

THIS year Down Under Sail will be reporting live from within the Club Marine/Lexus Adelaide to Port Lincoln Yacht Race.

Harry Fisher is on board Western Australian Sydney 47 Endorfin and will be updating the Down Under Sail website and Facebook page continuously throughout the race.

Stay up to date with this page to see live updates and exclusive images as they happen and also check the Facebook page for video footage.

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also have a look at the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

Saturday February 21, 1:12 pm
It was quite an eventful last few hours with breeze ranging from 2 to 20 knots.
We crossed the line in a strong northwesterly in Boston Bay, pushing us right to the very end.
The race took just more than 22 hours and now we’re on our way back to the Marina Hotel for a well deserved drink.
We hope you enjoyed the Down Under Sail live blog, stay tuned for updates next week during the Lincoln Week regatta.


Saturday February 21, 10:16 am
There’s some tired bodies on board Endorfin at the moment as we begin to see Donnington appear in the distance.
We had a bad run before Dangerous Reef and lost a lot of ground on Fresh and Aikin so we’re doing our best to claw back what we can.
The boat is currently doing around six to seven knots on the wind but rumour has it that there’s a few holes inside the bay that could slow us down again.


Saturday February 21, 8:37 am
We are still yet to reach Dangerous Reef and the breeze has died to a drift.
After more than 17 and a half hours sailing we are still coming within meters of other boats including 3 Cool Cats (pictured).
Hopefully we can make the turn in to Lincoln soon, I’m getting thirsty.


Saturday February 21, 7:01 am
If you look closely at the image you can see two boats just underneath the jib; Aikin the near boat and Fresh the further.
We’ve managed to get ahead of Shining Sea for now in the final stages of the race.
We’re not far from the Eyre Peninsula coast and are approaching Dangerous Reef however we’re now sailing in around five knots from the northeast.
Anything can happen now, the race is wide open.


Saturday February 21, 6:34 am
After a grueling night with several sail changes between spinnakers we managed to sail fast and crawl back some ground on Fresh, Shining Sea and Aikin.
The sun is now on it’s way up and we edge even closer to the finish line.
Not a lot of sleep on board, except for the occasional snooze on deck but as soon as it’s daylight the crew will be solely focused on finishing fast.


Saturday February 21, 12:50 am
It’s pitch black and we’ve been under spinnaker for a while.
We’ve just made the switch to the larger kite as we approach Cape Spencer with just over 15 knots behind us.
Boat speed around eight knots and looks like it’s downhill sailing from here.


Friday February 20, 9:44 pm
Not a lot to take a photo of at this hour but at the moment we’re doing around nine knots across the foot of Yorke Peninsula in 15 knots of breeze from the southeast.
Not a great start for the Endorfin team, about three miles behind rival Fresh.


Friday February 20, 8:53 pm
It’s hard to see, but that’s a boat next to us as we reach along the foot of Yorke Peninsula.
It’s going to be a difficult slog along this stretch with a big southern swell and a lot of ground to catch up.
If the breeze clocks east we might be looking at a sail change soon to a reaching jib or a spinnaker.
Updates may be fewer and further between throughout the night but stay tuned.
Also, I hope you all enjoy your dry beds, it’s getting wetter out here.


Friday February 20, 8:14 pm
We’re losing light and aren’t far off Marion Reef.
Fresh is still a fair way ahead but we’re hoping to have a good run off the wind and crawl back some distance.
Anything can happen in boat racing, especially at night.


Friday February 20, 7:37 pm
As the sun goes down the breeze is back up with 16 knots still on the nose and more than seven knots of boat speed.
We’re 11 miles from Marion Reef and are looking forward to getting around the foot and cracking the sails a little.
Jackets are on but still a good temperature on board.
Now time for some night sailing, should be fun.

Friday February 20, 6:14 pm
In lighter winds we decided to get stuck in to some dinner with crayfish on the menu.
When dinner settles hopefully we get some more wind and charge on to the foot of Yorke Peninsula.
Slow-ish race at the moment and our sister ship Fresh has gained a slight advantage over us so let’s hope it speeds up soon.

Friday February 20, 5:54 pm
After a solid start in 12 knots it has now dropped to below 10 and we’re putting the weight forward on the boat to try and maintain our speed.
With that being said we’ve gotten an early start on dinner digging in to some nice crayfish.
Wind is expected to swing further east, which may mean spinnakers as we get closer to Marion Reef.
More to come.

 
Friday February 20, 3:00 pm
The race is underway, what a hectic start.
We on Endorfin got closed in on the boat end and were lucky to get away cleanly.
Now all boats are on port tack in a 13-knot breeze headed for Marion Reef.
Stay tuned.

Friday February 20, 2:55 pm
Five minutes until the start of the race and 51 boats on the line, what a spectacle.
 
Friday February 20, 2:24 pm
The start is 36 minutes away and a consistent 12-knot southwesterly has come in.
Sails are being hoisted and it lools like it will be a positive start for the race.
Keep your eyes peeled for the big guns Secret Men’s Business and Scarlet Runner.

Friday February 20, 1:16 pm

Port Lincoln based Sydney 47 Fresh has left the dock at the Royal South Australian Yacht Squadron.

Breezes still look bleak but all are still hopeful for the sea breeze to come in around race time.

A few casual pre-race pleasantries had by opposition boats at the club house but now it’s time to get serious.

T-minus 1 hour and 44 minutes until start time.


Friday February 20, 11:15 am

Light winds have greeted sailors early in the day just less than 4 hours before the start.

It’s a soft northerly at the moment but a southwesterly afternoon sea breeze is expected to come through closer to the start time.
It might be a slow start but let’s hope we can make it to Marion Reef just off the near coast of the Yorke Peninsula foot before dark.
Cruising fleet have left Adelaide and are under spinnaker but not moving very fast.

If you’re looking to buy or sell a boat contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage to see the boats available on the Adelaide Boat Sales website. Visitwww.adelaideboatsales.com.au

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Marc Ablett or Harry Fisher by emailing downundersail@gmail.com

WEDNESDAY, 18 FEBRUARY 2015

Race within a race for Sydney 38s

BY HARRY FISHER

THE Sydney 38 fleet will race to Port Lincoln in their own division this year, with a total of five boats nominated for the 2015 Club Marine/Lexus Adelaide to Port Lincoln Yacht Race.

Competitors include David Knights’ White Knight, Derek Morrison’s Asylum, Bob Schahinger’s Clockwork, Seb Bohm’s Slipknot and Chris Hansen’s The Business.

Seb Bohm’s Slipknot sailing in last year’s Lincoln Week regatta. Photograph: Down Under Sail.


Slipknot tactician Anthony Wilson said the Sydney 38 sailors were looking forward to sailing their own “race within a race”.

“If the weather’s right we’re usually up in the top 10 on IRC, but then we’ve got our own race within ourselves to be the first 38 across the line,” he said.

Two years ago was the last time the Sydney 38s had their own division for the Adelaide to Port Lincoln race and held their state championship at the Lincoln Week regatta that follows, which featured some interstate boats as well.

This year the national titles will be held in Pittwater, New South Wales at the same time, which is why no interstate Sydney 38s have nominated, including last year’s Lincoln Week division one IRC winner Zen, skippered by Gordon Ketelby.

Gordon Ketelby’s Sydney 38 Zen was the division one IRC winner at last year’s Lincoln Week regatta.Photograph: Down Under Sail.

Wilson said Slipknot was heading in to the Lincoln race as the favourite after a successful Geelong Week campaign, but all other boats were going to be in the mix as well.

White Knight has been getting better, they did us last night (in the Cruising Yacht Club of South Australia twilight race) with few a extra people on board,” he said.

Asylum and The Business should be up there (in the Adelaide to Port Lincoln) too.”

Wilson said one design racing always provided added excitement to offshore racing where the smallest slip ups can quickly change the dynamic of the race.

” We haven’t raced against them much, but you just never know in one design racing, the littlest things make the biggest difference,” he said.

“Slacking off for half an hour overnight can cost you miles in the end.”

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley at Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also have a look at the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

The Sydney 38 fleet will also be competing in the Lincoln Week regatta that follows the long race and Wilson said they would be treating it as their unofficial state championships.

He said the South Australian Sydney 38 sailors would also be pushing to the national association to host a nationals in Port Lincoln as part of the Lincoln Week regatta in the future.

Wilson said Bob Schahinger’s Clockwork from the Royal South Australian Yacht Squadron has also nominated for the Lincoln race and will be set up to accommodate sailors with disabilities.

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Marc Ablett or Harry Fisher by emailing downundersail@gmail.com

Twilight race prepares sailors for Lincoln

BY HARRY FISHER

SOUTHERLY winds reaching 20 knots greeted 25 boats on Wednesday night for a twilight race in preparation for the 2015 Club Marine/Lexus Adelaide to Port Lincoln Yacht Race.

The Cruising Yacht Club of South Australia also welcomed some interstate guests this week as teams look to prepare for the race over to the west.

The crew on board Western Australian Sydney 47 Endorfin sailing in Wednesday’s twilight race. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

Graeme Footer’s 50-foot Marnico was the overall handicap winner on the night more than three minutes ahead of second place on corrected time.

Geoff Boettcher’s new TP-52 Secret Men’s Business was second overall, however didn’t look to be sailing as hard as possible, carrying a few of the team’s wives and girlfriends on board.

In third place was Sydney 38 White Knight skippered by David Knights who will head in to the long race with some form against the competing 38s.

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also visit the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

The first boat on handicap in the second division was Adrian Wotton’s School’s Out which sailed a great race to match it on handicap with the first division boats.

The club welcomed Western Australian Sydney 47 Endorfin, skippered by Mike Giles, for the twilight race which is preparing for their first Adelaide to Port Lincoln race and regatta.

Giles said he was looking forward to going head to head with Kym Clarke’s Port Lincoln based Sydney 47, Fresh, with several boat bets already placed between the two.

At the twilight race presentation, Cruising Yacht Club of South Australia commodore Geoff Boettcher wished all sailors doing the race to Port Lincoln the best of luck and a safe journey.

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Marc Ablett or Harry Fisher by emailing downundersail@gmail.com

SUNDAY, 15 FEBRUARY 2015

Stephens crowned as Melges state champ

BY HARRY FISHER

MELGES youngster Luke Stephens, 22, has taken out his first state championship in a senior class after a resounding victory in the South Australian Melges 24 state championships at Adelaide Sailing Club over the weekend.

In light and difficult conditions over the three days, Stephens won three of the five races, holding off veteran Robin Deussen in a close battle.

Luke Stephens and his crew on Adrenaline won their first Melges 24 state championship at Adelaide Sailing Club over the weekend. Photograph: Ally Graham.

The early championship lead to Stephens paid dividends as the challenging conditions only allowed five races to be sailed out of a scheduled seven.

Stephens, who skippered Adrenaline, said the light winds were a great help as he considered himself to be a better light air sailor.

“It wasn’t typical Adelaide sea breeze weather for this time of year,” Stephens said.

“It suited us because I’m a light air sailor and enjoyed the conditions.

“Being from Port Lincoln I have a lot more confidence when it comes to sailing in shifty breezes.”

In the absence of crew member and boat owner Hamish Nicol, Stephens changed from a four-man to a five-man crew with father-son pair of Anthony and Oscar Mitton joining the team.

Along with regular crew Matt Pernini and Luke Hookings, Stephens said the team adapted to the changes quickly.

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also visit the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

He said he was happy with how the boat was set up and even with a change in the normal crew, boat speed was not an issue.

“We were very happy with how the boat went over the weekend, considering we had quite a significant change in crew,” Stephens said.

“We just had boat speed over the rest of the fleet the whole weekend, which is a massive help.”

Deussen, sailing Red Mist, was closely trailing Stephens all weekend however needed to close down a four-point gap in the final race to steal victory.

A safe race from Stephens in what was expected to be the final race of the regatta in very challenging conditions saw him finish fifth just behind Deussen in third for theAdrenaline team to win their maiden state title.

The Adrenaline team of Luke Stephens, Oscar Mitton, Matt Pernini, Anthony Mitton and Luke Hookings at the South Australian Melges 24 state championship presentation. Photograph: Ally Graham.

Many of the Melges 24 sailors are now looking forward to the Club Marine/Lexus Adelaide to Port Lincoln Yacht Race, which leaves Adelaide on Friday.

Megles 24 skipper Jason Ward on Concubine, who was third overall in the Melges 24 states, will be sailing in the race over to Port Lincoln on his Beneteau First 40 under the same name with a crew predominantly made up of Melges sailors, including Stephens.

Stephens said it was a great opportunity for the Melges fleet to get together on the same boat and blend their skills, which has ultimately resulted in a successful season so far.

Adrenaline struggling to set a spinnaker in the light conditions experienced on Sunday. Photograph: Ally Graham.

“Most of the guys that race Melges are doing the race over to Lincoln,” he said.

“A lot of them are also on (Ward’s Beneteau First 40) Concubine as well, which is going to be good fun.

“The forecast looks reasonably light for the race over and our boat doesn’t do that great in the light breezes but we’ll see how we go.”

As well as the boat’s first Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race in December last year, it has also claimed a division two IRC win at Geelong Week and various offshore race IRC victories in Adelaide throughout the season.

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Marc Ablett or Harry Fisher by emailing downundersail@gmail.com

SATURDAY, 14 FEBRUARY 2015

More than 50 in race to Lincoln

BY HARRY FISHER

MORE than 50 boats have entered for this year’s Club Marine/Lexus Adelaide to Port Lincoln Yacht Race next Friday including several interstate competitors.

A total of 44 boats are entered in the racing division, which will leave Adelaide at 3pm, while seven boats have entered in the cruising division, who have the earlier 10am start.

Kym Clarke’s Sydney 47 Fresh from the Port Lincoln Yacht Club in last year’s Club Marine/Lexus Lincoln Week regatta. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

Interstate boats are well represented this year with five Victorian boats and one Western Australian making the trip to Adelaide for the race.

Atop the list of interstate boats is Rob Date’s 52-foot Reichel-Pugh Scarlet Runner, a former three-time Adelaide to Port Lincoln line honours winner.

Western Australian Michael Giles and his crew on Sydney 47 Endorfin also head to Adelaide for the boat’s first Adelaide to Port Lincoln race and will also compete in the Lincoln Week regatta that follows.

Alan Woodward’s Beneteau First 45 Reverie, Martin Power’s 44-foot Bacardi, Peter Young’s The Brothers and Pete and Marissa Chalkley’s Hush make up the remainder of the interstate boats all making the trip over from Victoria.

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also visit the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

Four boats will compete in the race from the Port Lincoln Yacht Club headed by another Sydney 47, Fresh, owned by Kym Clarke.

Sources have told Down Under Sail that bets between Fresh and Endorfin have already been placed with the wager standing at 20 jugs of rum and cola for the first boat over the line.

Other Port Lincoln boats racing include Grant Eckermann’s Speakeasy and Jonathan Newbury’s Sextant, which are entered in the racing division while Guy Manthorpe’sTauremka will compete in the cruising division.

Among the fleet are some top contenders including Adelaide to Port Lincoln race veteran Geoff Boettcher’s newly purchased TP-52, formerly Beau Geste and now renamed as Secret Men’s Business.

The old 38-foot Secret Men’s Business, skippered by Geoff Boettcher, which won overall IRC in last year’s Club Marine/Lexus Adelaide to Port Lincoln race. Photograph: Down Under Sail.

Boettcher will be joined in the race by his rival Date on Scarlet Runner, which rekindles the flames of a rivalry between the pair from years gone by.

Unfortunately Scarlet Runner missed last year’s Adelaide to Port Lincoln race due to commitments racing overseas but is back in 2015 for another crack at Boettcher.

The early money looks to be on the TP-52 for line honours however depending on weather conditions, the race for IRC honours is wide open.

Sydney 47’s Fresh and Endorfin, as well as Jason Ward’s Concubine, Cailin Howard and David Oliver’s Aikin, Andrew Corletto’s Shining Sea and Andrew Saies Two True also look to be in contention for the overall IRC result.

Sailors with their boats already in Adelaide will look to get a bit of early practice in on Wednesday night with a twilight race at the Cruising Yacht Club of South Australia, sponsored by Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and Adelaide Boat Sales.

The four-day Lincoln Week regatta will also be a popular event with a total of 33 entries in both racing and cruising divisions.

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Marc Ablett or Harry Fisher by emailing downundersail@gmail.com

For race and regatta details head to the Lincoln Week website.

FRIDAY, 30 JANUARY 2015

Boston Bay Sharpie Sprint Series – Form Guide

Harry Fisher skippering Pre-Mature with Joe Kelly and Hannah Hood.

BY HARRY FISHER

THIS Sunday will see eight sharpies battle it out for the inaugural Boston Bay Sharpie Sprint Series hosted by the Port Lincoln Yacht Club and Down Under Sail have put together another comprehensive form guide for the event.

The format for the regatta will be six to eight short course races and it is expected the tricky conditions close to shore will provide some challenges for the sailors. There won’t be an inch given in this fleet and it will be interesting to see who will come away with the trophy.

Word around the traps was that some Adelaide boats might make the trip over but a lack of correspondence late in the week means we will just have to wait and see.

Now for the form guide…

SA 917 – Finger Jam
Miles Stephens has taken over the helm of Finger Jam this year, with owner Byron Russ moving forward to the wire. The change has proven to be a winning one, with the boat yet to lose a race this season when on the water. Sheet hand Wade Gray joins the fray and is expected to add a touch of intensity to the team. Expect these guys to be a powerhouse if the breeze is up but might be brought back closer to the fleet in the light stuff. The early favourite, but anything can happen.

SA 866 – Dozenmatter
A young and talented crew fill out Team Dozen this weekend and they are expected to be firing on all cylinders by the scheduled start time of 1pm. Mark Barwick has proven himself on the helm with several club race victories however a new job and a mixed bag of crew over the last few weeks has tarnished his consistency. Youngster Marty Hood, fresh off a seventh place at the recent cadet national titles, joins in on the sheets and will add a bit of class to the already promising team. Joe Kelly will wear the harness for the day and add plenty of enthusiasm. These guys may just snag a few close victories and give the Finger Jam crew a run for their money.

SA 789 – INXS
This boat is truly a relic but there is no doubt that skipper Ben Kelsey knows how to point it in the right direction. He has not had any issues with boat speed and certainly knows the waters of Boston Bay better than most skippers in the fleet so it will be very interesting to see how he goes. The local wind-whispering prawn fisherman Matt Stephens joins in for the day and will add that little bit of extra local knowledge to the boat. Keep your eyes peeled for the big maroon weapon as Kelso will have it around the mark in the top three more often than not.

SA 884 – Pre-Mature
These guys have shown some promise throughout the season so far but there is no doubt they haven’t lived up to their full potential just yet. The wily old salt Paul Watson has returned to the helm of a sharpie for the first time in 14 years this season and has shown plenty of potential, however has the tendency to lose his marbles every now and then. Boat owner Harry Fisher will be on the wire and the powerhouse James Flint will be raring to go on the sheets. Sources tell us the boat has been in the shop for the last fortnight getting the once over from the former owner of Vicious and if the bells are ding dong-ing come Sunday these guys could be a surprise packet.

SA 791 – Salted Nuts
These guys have been a regular appearance during the resurrection year of the Port Lincoln sharpie fleet and have definitely shown glimpses of brilliance at certain times throughout the year. Pagan Henley has been on the helm all year and can definitely match it with the older blokes of the class. With her old man Ralph being one of the lighter blokes in the fleet on the wire, the team has struggled in a breeze. Consequently Pagan’s found herself trawling for prawns with the big purple kite in the middle of the bay on more than a couple of occasions. The short courses and in-close sailing will suit the Nuts and we wouldn’t put it past these guys to turn a few heads come Sunday.

Mark Forbes skippering Mark It Zero with Zali Forbes and Cameron Forbes.


SA 850 – Mark It Zero
The only boat in the local fleet this year to be purchased and brought over from the big smoke. Forbesy has enjoyed getting involved in the Port Lincoln sharpie fleet with his daughter Zali stoking the sheets and doing very well. A bargain buy and a well put together boat, these guys will have no issues with speed if it’s set up well. The short and stocky front man Andrew Puglisi will add some banter and chat to the team so expect these guys to spice things up on the fast-paced start line. Definitely a contender for a surprise race win so keep your eyes peeled for 850.

SA 832 – Murderess
The Cummins-based inland sailor Kym Wright has only had one taste of the bay this season and we are yet to see the boat in action in 2015. For all we know he could have it tucked away in the shed giving her a bit of a birthday but sources tell us Wrighty is just biding his time for the right opportunity. And the opportunities don’t come much better than this, with short course racing on offer in Boston Bay. He welcomes interstate sheet hand Steph Johnstone from Canberra to the boat, fresh off a solid performance at the recent national titles in Sydney, as well as veteran Stuart de la Perrelle on the wire. These guys are a real dark horse and could well come out and jag some amazing results in the top bunch. This is a boat that has been synonymous with Port Lincoln sailing over the years, we really just don’t know what they are capable of.

SA 782 – The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
Sources tell us that Squeaky Barwick has lent his boat to some of Port Lincoln’s most experienced sharpie sailors from days gone by, with a combined total of more sailing hours on the bay than the average youngster could dream about. We’ve heard Bronte Flint will be on board as well as the messiah Phil Kelly and they have recruited the likes of Simon “Growler” Growden as well. The boat was a resurrected wreck from Tumby Bay that hasn’t shown a great deal of boat speed this season but in the right hands on the short and unpredictable courses, it would not be a surprise if these guys came out and won the whole thing. Watch this space.

Down Under Sail will be providing live updates throughout the course of the day so head to our Facebook page and give us a ‘like’ to stay up to date with the regatta as it happens.

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also visit the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

SUNDAY, 4 JANUARY 2015

Higgins doesn’t lose Focus and re-writes history

Ollie Hartas from Hartas Productions was on the water at the recent sharpie nationals and produced some amazing videos of sharpies in full flight. Check out the wrap up video and interview with Mal Higgins.
Visit the Hartas Productions Facebook page or YouTube channel.

BY HARRY FISHER

SHARPIE veteran Mal Higgins has re-written the history books claiming his seventh sharpie national title after a resounding win on the waters of Botany Bay over the past week.

Higgins, with crew Andrew Chisholm and Sam Sanderson in Focus, secured the championship with a race to spare and cruised through to a victory-lap-style win in race seven on the final day of racing.

SA 930 Focus sailing on Botany Bay. Photographs: Lou Hollis

Higgins claimed five out of the seven race wins hosted by the Georges River Sailing Club, discarding his eighth from race one with his worst carried result being a third in race six.

The regatta was mostly dominated by South Australians with Geoff McCloud inWarpig with Mark Beaumont and Sam Flint in second and Jason Heritage in Fresh Bread with James Hughes and Darren Witty in third.

21-year-old Ryan Kelly skippering Nude with young gun crew Tom Schnaars and Sean Keen were a real stand out, finishing the regatta fifth overall and turning some heads along the way.

Now with seven titles, Higgins has equaled Queensland yachting legend and sharpie class patron John Cuneo’s long-standing record recognising them both as the two most successful sharpie skippers in the 72-year history of the class, in either of the heavyweight or lightweight models.

Mal Higgins in Focus (right) going head to head with David Snoad in Beer Nuts

Cuneo won a total of three heavyweight sharpie national championships in 1956, 1958 and 1960 and four lightweight championships in 1961, 1962, 1964 and 1965, boasting a record that some thought would never be challenged.

Higgins’ dominance throughout the last decade has allowed him to claim six championships in the last seven nationals he has attended since 2006/7, to join his maiden title from 1999 in Nest Of Vipers at Royal Brighton (Victoria).

Although the record speaks for itself, Higgins said there was still one prize he had not achieved.

He said he still wanted to win a title in Western Australia, which was the only state he hadn’t won in.

Mal Higgins cruises ahead to one of his five race wins

The last time Higgins sailed a nationals in Western Australia was at East Fremantle in 2007/8 where he finished fourth in Blur behind winner Wade Henson in Vicious, runner up Peter Chappell in The Lizard, and hometown sparring partner Geoff “Sam” McCloud in Pig Out who finished third.

Difficulties with children’s optimist sailing forced Higgins to miss last year’s Western Australia nationals at Mounts Bay, which was eventually won by Chappell, however he said he hoped to return in the future to have another go.

Sharpie nationals top 10 results

Click here for sharpie nationals results or visit the New South Wales sharpie website.

For more information about Down Under Sail contact Marc Ablett or Harry Fisher atdownundersail@gmail.com

If you’re looking to sell a boat you no longer need, contact Brett Yardley from Quin’s Yacht Brokerage and have your boat advertised on the Adelaide Boat Sales website.

Also visit the website to see what’s around if you’re looking to buy.

www.adelaideboatsales.com.au
Brett Yardley: 0438 800 501
Send an email

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